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PhD Students

Daniel ArmaniosDaniel Armanios

armanios@stanford.edu

(2009 - ) Daniel Erian Armanios is a PhD student in the Stanford Technology Ventures Program in the department of Management Science & Engineering. Daniel’s research interest is on sustainability and entrepreneurship in emerging economies. His current projects focus on the role of public-private institutions in assisting Chinese technology entrepreneurs and on developing water management tools for managers in Tanzania and in China.

Daniel holds two Bachelor’s degrees in Mechanical Engineering and in Political Science from the University of Pittsburgh and two Master’s degrees in Management Research and Water Science, Policy and Management from the University of Oxford. Prior to his doctoral work, he conducted numerous research projects for organizations such as NASA, NOAA, the UNOHCHR, the General Motors Corporation, the Government of Malaysia, and a variety of NGOs specializing in community-based infrastructure development. He also founded the group Session: Middle East whose work on the Arab-Israeli conflict resolution is translated into five languages. Daniel enjoys being amazed everyday by his beautiful new wife and writing spoken word during his free time.

Michael ChristensenMichael Christensen

mqc@stanford.edu

(2011 - ) Michael Christensen is a PhD student at the Stanford Technology Ventures Program in the department of Management Science & Engineering. Michael’s research interests focus on understanding innovation trends within industries, as well as understanding how businesses identify and explore opportunities for innovation within their business and organization.

Michael received his MBA with High Distinction from the Harvard Business School, graduating as a George F. Baker Scholar, and also holds an AB, with Honors, from Harvard University in History of Art and Architecture. In addition to his academic accomplishments, Michael has spent a number of years working in management and innovation consulting, including time at Monitor Group, Innosight and IDEO, where he engaged in projects across numerous industries, including pharmaceuticals, medical devices, consumer goods and financial services.

Douglas HannahDouglas Hannah

dphannah@stanford.edu

(2009 - ) Douglas Hannah is a Ph.D. student in the Stanford Technology Ventures Program in the department of Management Science & Engineering. His research interests revolve around collaborative firm innovation processes and the formation of inter-firm networks, particularly in the emerging electric vehicles sector. These phenomena are explored through a variety of analytical and simulation modeling tools. Doug holds a B.A. in Environmental Studies with Honors from Dartmouth College and an M.S. in Management Science and Engineering from Stanford University.

Prior to doctoral work, Doug co-founded an environmental advocacy and outreach group (www.thebiggreenbus.org) and worked as an analyst at the Cadmus Group, a policy consulting firm based in Boston, MA. On any given weekend you may find him exploring the hills on his trusty Cannondale or searching San Francisco for the perfect cup of coffee.

Garrett HeathGarrett Heath

gheath@stanford.edu

(2010 - ) Garrett Heath is a Ph.D. candidate at the Stanford Technology Venture Program in the Department of Management Science & Engineering at Stanford University. Garrett’s research interests include entrepreneurial finance, dynamic corporate strategy, as it applies to cultivating change and remaining flexible in fast-paced markets, and health policy.

Prior to doctoral work, Garrett worked in marketing for the Fastenal Corporation and as a financial manager for the Beefeaters Eating Club. Additionally, Garrett currently competes as a professional runner for the Saucony Corporation and is involved with the decision making process for the shoes and apparel that they produce. Thus far, Garrett has achieved both B.S. and M.S. degrees in Management Science and Engineering from Stanford University. In pursuing the B.S. degree he concentrated on decision and financial engineering, while in the M.S. program he focused on organizations, technology and entrepreneurship.

Wesley W. KooWesley W. Koo

shwesley@stanford.edu

(2012 - ) Wesley Koo is a Ph.D. candidate at the Stanford Technology Venture Program in the Department of Management Science & Engineering at Stanford University. He is broadly interested in entrepreneurship in emerging economies and the role of the institutional environment. His research projects focus on how market reforms affect new venture formation and on the relationship between business groups and entrepreneurial activities.

Wesley holds two Bachelor’s degrees in Environmental Engineering and Finance from MIT, where he was a Richard P. Feynman Scholar. He has led and mentored numerous service projects to countries including China, Malaysia and the Philippines, and served as Chairman of the Board at the Southeast Asian Service & Leadership Network. Prior to joining Stanford, he worked at an energy start-up in western China.

Michael LeatherbeeMichael Leatherbee

mile@stanford.edu

(2010 - ) Michael Leatherbee is a Ph.D. candidate at the Stanford Technology Venture Program in the Department of Management Science & Engineering at Stanford University. His research interests revolve around the emergence of high-value entrepreneurial opportunities--where individuals, behaviors and environments collide. He is currently conducting research on the effects of policies and programs on entrepreneurial skills.

Michael is Assistant Professor of Innovation at Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Advisory Board Member of Start-Up Chile, and Faculty Director of Innovation Management at DICTUC. In 2003 he co-founded Yx Wireless, one of Chile’s emblematic technology ventures. As the company's CEO he successfully scaled it to a leading position in Latin America. Before joining Stanford, he developed a course on Technology Ventures, designed a Minor of Innovation, and co-designed an executive Masters of Innovation. He also led the establishment of a partnership for entrepreneurship education between Universidad Católica, STVP and Ministerio de Economía de Chile.

Jamber LiJian Bai “Jamber” Li

jamberli@stanford.edu

(2010 - ) Jian Bai “Jamber” Li is a Ph.D. candidate at the Stanford Technology Venture Program in the Department of Management Science & Engineering at Stanford University. Jamber’s research interests include the influence of institutions and culture on firms' behavior and performance in emerging economies. In particular, he is interested in how firms interact with cultural values and ethos and whether particular cultures (loosely defined) confer competitive advantage in the international economy.

He is currently tackling this question by studying the strategy and performance of high-tech entrepreneurial ventures in China. Jamber holds a B.S. in Biological and Environmental Engineering from Cornell University.

Timothy OttTimothy Ott

tott@stanford.edu

(2010 - ) Tim Ott is a PhD student at the Stanford Technology Ventures Program in the Department of Management Science & Engineering at Stanford University. Tim is still narrowing his focus but his primary research interests are in hybrid economies (i.e. open source platforms) and social entrepreneurship with broader interests in organizational learning, adaptation, and experimentation.

Tim holds a Bachelor of Applied Science in Computer Science and a Bachelor of Science in Economics with a minor in Psychology from the University of Pennsylvania's Jerome Fischer Management & Technology Program. Before returning for PhD studies Tim worked as an IT consultant for 5 years and completed his Masters in Management Science & Engineering at Stanford.

Henning PiezunkaHenning Piezunka

piezunka@stanford.edu

(2008 - ) Henning Piezunka is a PhD student at the Stanford Technology Ventures Program in the Department of Management Science & Engineering at Stanford University. His research interests focus on platform-based industries. Methodologically he is particularly interested in simulation.

Henning received a Diploma in Business Administration from the University of Mannheim (Germany) and a Master of Science in Decision Science from the London School of Economics (UK).

Henning has been a visiting student at the Institut d’Etudes (Paris, France) and at the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University (NC, USA). Prior to coming to Stanford he co-founded a web consulting firm who serves clients in more than 60 countries. To learn more about Henning and his work, visit www.henningpiezunka.com.

Sruthi ThatchenkerySruthi Thatchenkery

sruthi@stanford.edu

(2010 - ) Sruthi Thatchenkery is a PhD student at the Stanford Technology Ventures Program in the Department of Management Science & Engineering at Stanford University. Her research interests include how competition and collaboration affect new product development and innovation, as well as the strategies firms use to protect their intellectual property.

Sruthi received a B.S. in Economics with high distinction from Duke University. Prior to doctoral studies, she worked as an analyst at Cornerstone Research, an economic consulting firm. At Cornerstone she worked on a variety of cases in the antitrust and intellectual property practice areas involving companies in pharmaceuticals, energy, and industrial manufacturing.

Zachariah J. RodgersZachariah J. Rodgers

zrodgers@stanford.edu

(2012 - ) Zachariah is a first year PhD student in Work, Technology & Organization, closely related to Stanford Technology Ventures Program, within the department of Management Science & Engineering at Stanford University. Zachariah's research interests focus on alignment between organizational and societal outcomes.

He holds a BA with distinction and highest honors in Asian Studies and Economics from the University of Michigan, and an MBA from Brigham Young University's Marriott School, where he was a Hawes Scholar. Zachariah also has work experience as an entrepreneur, where he leveraged online market analysis to sell wholesale and retail consumer goods.